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 New Maths Curriculum September 2014 – Information for Parents

 

From September 2014 we will be working from the Government’s New Maths Curriculum. There are many changes to the current curriculum including a larger focus on number. Each child must meet all of the objectives by the time they move into the next year group. The New Maths Curriculum is set out into 6 sections.

 

Number – including Number and Place Value, Addition and Subtraction, Multiplication and Division and Fractions ( including Decimals (Year 4, 5 & 6) and Percentages (Year 5 & 6).

Measurement.

Ratio and Proportion (Year 6 only).

Algebra (Year 6 only).

Geometry – including Position and Direction.

Statistics.

 

The New Curriculum has a much greater emphasis on mental maths (pupils are expected to know all table facts to 12 x12 by Year 4), calculation and fractions, in addition to pupils being required to understand and use numbers that are much larger than those of the previous curriculum. One of the biggest changes is that by the time the children are at the end of Year 3 they must be able to use a formal written method for all operations and the differentiated outcomes throughout the years will be in the size of the numbers the children are using.

Due to this we have revised our calculation policies to be in line with the New Curriculum and to ensure that we will all be using the same methods to calculate in the 4 operations.

 

Cross Curricular Maths

As before, where possible and relevant, teachers will make cross curricular links between maths and other subject areas. This ensures relevant links between subjects are maximised, allows maths to be applied and links maths to real life. For example, Handling Data in Numeracy might be linked to a Science topic that involves collecting data.

Whole school theme days and weeks

Increasingly, at times during the year there will be whole school theme weeks or days linked to numeracy. These weeks are used to excite and engage pupils, instilling in them a love of maths, as well as being an excellent opportunity to invite you as parents to be involved in your child/children’s learning.

 

 

 

 New Curriculum 2014 - Y1 maths to practise at home

 

These are some of the end of year expectations for the New 2014 Curriculum.

Please practise the relevant skills at home with your child.

Don’t forget to check that they can do all of the skills from the previous years.

 

By the end of year 1, pupils should be able to:

- recall and reason with number bonds to 10 then 20 in several forms for example, 9 + 7 = 16; 16 – 7 = 9; 7 = 16 – 9

- count to and across 100, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number e.g. 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103 (crossing 100)

- count, read and write numbers to 100 in numerals e.g. 34, 86

- given a number, identify one more and one less e.g. 1 more than 24 is 25, 1 less than 84 is 83

- count in twos, fives and tens. e.g. count 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 etc, notice the pattern of 0, 5, 0, 5 endings; include counting in twos from 1 as well as 2, recognising odd and even numbers e.g. 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15

 

 

Useful websites for practise at home:

http://www.ictgames.com/numberFacts.htm

http://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/skip-counting.html

http://www.wmnet.org.uk/wmnet/custom/files_uploaded/uploaded_resources/848/more&less.swf

http://www.doorwayonline.org.uk/oddandeven-fullscreen.html

http://www.ictgames.com/fairy_fog_odd.html

 

 

 

 New Curriculum 2014 - Y2 maths to practise at home

 

These are some of the end of year expectations for the New 2014 Curriculum.

Please practise the relevant skills at home with your child.

Don’t forget to check that they can do all of the skills from the previous years.

 

By the end of year 2, pupils should be able to:

- count in steps of 2, 3, and 5 from 0, e.g. 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30

and in tens from any number, forward and backward  e.g. 87, 77, 67, 57, 47, 37, 27, 17, 7

- recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently, and derive and use related facts up to 100 e.g. become increasingly fluent in deriving facts such as using 3 + 7 = 10; 10 – 7 = 3 and 7 = 10 – 3 to calculate 30 + 70 = 100; 100 – 70 = 30 and 70 = 100 – 30.

- recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables and connect them to each other for example, 4 × 5 = 20 and 20 ÷ 5 = 4

and including recognising odd and even numbers (see year 1 information)

- compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100; e.g. put a set in order 34, 62, 18, 91, 26 - use <, > and = signs. e.g. 78 > 32; 40 + 3 < 60 + 3; 50 + 7 = 40 +

 

Useful websites for practise at home:

http://www.innovationslearning.co.uk/subjects/maths/activities/year4/greater_than/start.htm

 

http://www.topmarks.co.uk/ordering-and-sequencing/caterpillar-ordering

 

http://www.teachingtables.co.uk/tm/tmgame/tgame2.html

 

http://www.doorwayonline.org.uk/oddandeven-fullscreen.html

 

http://www.ictgames.com/fairy_fog_odd.html

 

 

 

 New Curriculum 2014 - Y3 maths to practise at home

These are some of the end of year expectations for the New 2014 Curriculum.

Please practise the relevant skills at home with your child.

Don’t forget to check that they can do all of the skills from the previous years.

By the end of year 3, pupils should be able to:

- count from 0 in multiples of 4, 8, 50 and 100; find 10 or 100 more or less than a given number ( 2, 3, 5 and 10 learned in Y2)

 

e.g. 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, 56, 64, 72, 80

- recall (LEARN THESE TABLES OFF BY HEART IN ANY ORDER)

and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 and 10 multiplication

tables

through doubling connect 2, 4, 8, multiplications e.g. if 7 x 2 = 14, 7 x 4 is double

14 which is 28 and 7 x 8 is double 28 which is 56

e.g. know that 8 x 5 is the same as 5 x 8 and use this to work out the missing number in

÷ 8 = 5 or 8 = 40 ÷

e.g. 4 x 12 x 5 = 4 x 5 x 12 = 20 x 12 = 2 x 12 x 10 = 240

e.g. use 3 × 2 = 6, 6 ÷ 3 = 2 and 2 = 6 ÷ 3 to derive 30 × 2 = 60, 60 ÷ 3 = 20 and 20 = 60 ÷ 3

- compare and order numbers up to 1000

 

e.g. understand that 648 is 600 + 40 + 8 and use this to order a set of numbers such as , 648, 468, 846, 684, 864, 486

Useful websites for practise at home:

http://www.topmarks.co.uk/maths-games/7-11-years/multiplication-and-division

http://www.ictgames.com/caterpillar_slider.html (ordering numbers)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks2/maths/number/multiplication_division/play/

http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/mathgames/placevalue/BPOrder1000.htm

http://www.mad4maths.com/8_x_multiplication_table_math_game/

http://resources.oswego.org/games/mathmagician/mathsdiv.swf

http://www.everyschool.co.uk/maths-key-stage-2-division-2.html

 

 

 

 New Curriculum 2014 - Y4 maths to practise at home

These are some of the end of year expectations for the New 2014 Curriculum.

Please practise the relevant skills at home with your child.

Don’t forget to check that they can do all of the skills from the previous years.

By the end of year 4, pupils should be able to:

- count in multiples of 6, 7, 9, 25 and 1000

 

e.g. 0, 7, 14, 21, 28 etc. or 25, 50, 75, 100, 125, 150 etc.

- recall (LEARN THESE TABLES OFF BY HEART IN ANY ORDER)

 

multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12

use place value, known and derived facts

e.g. 600 ÷ 3 = 200 can be derived from 2 x 3 = 6

e.g. 39 × 7 = 30 × 7 + 9 × 7

e.g. (2 × 3) × 4 = 2 × (3 × 4)

e.g. 2 x 6 x 5 = 2 x 5 x 6 = 10 x 6 = 60.

- order and compare numbers beyond 1000

 

e.g. What is the value of the 3 in the number 4,328?

e.g. Which is the largest 3,562; 3,532 or 3,235

- count backwards through zero to include negative numbers

 

e.g. count back in steps of 3 from 11: 11, 8, 5, 2, -1, - 4, -7

- round any number to the nearest 10, 100 or 1000

 

e.g. What is 3528 rounded to the nearest 10/100/1000?

- read Roman numerals to 100 (I to C) and know that over time, the numeral system changed to include the concept of zero and place value.

 

N.B. Roman numerals should be put in their historical context so pupils understand that there have been different ways to write whole numbers and that the important concepts of zero and place value were introduced over a period of time (see Roman Numerals chart and link to game).

Useful websites for practise at home:

http://www.roman-numerals.org/chart100.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks2/maths/number/negative_numbers/read/1/

http://www.funbrain.com/tens/index.html (place value)

http://pbskids.org/cyberchase/media/games/negativenumbers/negativenumbers.html

 

 

 

 New Curriculum 2014 - Y5 maths to practise at home

These are some of the end of year expectations for the New 2014 Curriculum.

Please practise the relevant skills at home with your child.

Don’t forget to check that they can do all of the skills from the previous years.

By the end of year 5, pupils should be able to:

- read, write, order and compare numbers to at least 1 000 000 and determine the value of each digit

 

What is the value of the 3 in the number 235,107?

- count forwards or backwards in steps of powers of 10 for any given number up to 1 000 000

 

e.g. count forwards in thousands from 562,374: 562,374; 563,374; 564,374; 565,374; 566,374; 567,374; 568,374; 569,374; 570,374 etc

- recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12 LEARN

 

- interpret negative numbers in context, count forwards and backwards with positive and negative whole numbers, including through zero

 

e.g. The temperature was 7°C lower in Moscow than in Toronto. It was 4°C in Toronto. What was the temperature in Moscow?

- round any number up to 1 000 000 to the nearest 10, 100, 1000, 10 000 and 100 000

 

e.g. What is 943,528 rounded to the nearest 10/100/1000/10,000/100,000?

- read Roman numerals to 1000 (M) and recognise years written in Roman numerals (see Year 4)

 

- recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12

 

(LEARN THESE TABLES OFF BY HEART IN ANY ORDER)

- recognise and use square numbers and cube numbers, and the notation for squared (2) and cubed (3)

- a square number is the product of a number multiplied by itself e.g. 16 is a square number as it is the product of 4 x 4 or 42

- a cube number is the product of a number multiplied by itself twice more

- e.g. 64 is a cube number as it is the product of 4 x 4 x 4 or 43

 

Examples of using squared and cubed numbers in maths. 4 x 35 = 2 x 2 x 35; 3 x 270 = 3 x 3 x 9 x 10 = 92 x 10

4 x 160 = 4 x 4 x 4 x 10 = 43 x 10

Useful websites for practise at home:

http://www.funbrain.com/tens/index.html (place value – superbrain level)

http://www.roman-numerals.org/chart100.html

http://www.wmnet.org.uk/wmnet/custom/files_uploaded/uploaded_resources/850/counterv1.swf

(counting in steps of powers of ten)

http://www.primarygames.co.uk/pg3/orderegg/ordereggsKS2.htm

http://www.helpingwithmath.com/resources/games/target_2x/2xtable.html

 

 

 

 New Curriculum 2014 - Y6 maths to practise at home

These are some of the end of year expectations for the New 2014 Curriculum.

Please practise the relevant skills at home with your child.

Don’t forget to check that they can do all of the skills from the previous years.

By the end of year 6, pupils should be able to:

- read, write, order and compare numbers up to 10 000 000 and determine the value of each digit

 

What is the value of 5 in 9, 563, 217?

- recall multiplication and division facts for multiplication tables up to 12 × 12 LEARN

- recognise and use square numbers and cube numbers, and the notation for squared (2) and cubed (3)

 

a square number is the product of a number multiplied by itself e.g. 16 is a square number as it is the product of 4 x 4 or 42

a cube number is the product of a number multiplied by itself twice more

e.g. 64 is a cube number as it is the product of 4 x 4 x 4 or 43

Examples of using squared and cubed numbers in maths 4 x 35 = 2 x 2 x 35; 3 x 270 = 3 x 3 x 9 x 10 = 92 x 10

4 x 160 = 4 x 4 x 4 x 10 = 43 x 10

- identify common factors, common multiples and prime numbers

 

a common factor is whole number that divides two (or more) other numbers exactly e.g. 4 is a common factor of 8, 12 and 20

a common multiple is a multiple that is shared by two or more numbers.

e.g. 12 is a multiple of 2 and 6 because 12 = 2 x 6

12 is a multiple of 3 and 4 because 12 = 3 x 4

So 12 is a common multiple of 2, 3, 4, and 6

a prime number is a number that only has two factors; it can only be divided by itself and one. Examples of prime numbers 5, 7, 11, 13

5 is a prime number because 5 = 1 x 5 5 ÷ 1 = 5

Link to a maths dictionary for kids: http://www.amathsdictionaryforkids.com/dictionary.html

- recall and use equivalences between simple fractions, decimals and percentages

 

e.g. = 50% = 0.25, = 25% = 0.25, = 20% = 0.2, = 40% = 0.4 , = 80% = 0.8 21 41 51 52 54

e.g.100% represents a whole quantity and 1% is , 50% is , 25% is 100 1 100 50 100 25

Useful websites for practise at home:

http://www.funbrain.com/tens/index.html

http://www.math-play.com/Factors-and-Multiples-Jeopardy/Factors-and-Multiples-Jeopardy.html

https://www.mangahigh.com/engb/maths_games/number/factors_multiples_and_primes/prime_numbers

http://www.mathplayground.com/Decention/Decention.html ( fractions, decimals, percentages)

http://www.primarygames.co.uk/pg3/orderegg/ordereggsKS2.htm

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